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Ravaris Moore

Assistant Professor of Sociology | Sociology

Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES

Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts

Biography

Ravaris Moore is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California. Professor Moore is a quantitative sociologist with training in the fields of Social Stratification and Social Demography. His work employs quantitative methods with large-scale microdata to explore questions of inequality at the intersection of race and ethnicity, education, and health. His present research studies the effects of gun-violence exposure on the educational outcomes of students attending California public schools. Work with co-authors studies heterogeneous effects of parental divorce on the educational attainment of children.

Professor Moore earned his B.A. at Morehouse College with a double major in Mathematics and Economics. He completed his doctoral studies in Sociology, as well as M.A. degrees in Sociology and Economics at UCLA. Prior to matriculating at UCLA, he contributed to several national evaluations as a Research Programmer at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. in the areas of education, health, and child and family well-being.

Education

University of California at Los Angeles

Ph.D., Sociology

Morehouse College

B.A., Mathematics and Economics

University of California at Los Angeles

M.A., Economics

Areas of Expertise

Quantitative MethodsEducationGun-Violence Exposure

Articles

Causality in Life Course Studies

Handbook of the Life Course

2016. Pp. 515-539 in Handbook of the Life Course, 2nd Edition, Michael Shanahan, Monica Johnson, and Jeylan Mortimer eds., Springer Series.

Does career and technical education strengthen the STEM pipeline? Comparing students with and without disabilities

Journal of Disability Policy Studies

Gottfried, Michael A., Robert Bozick, Ernest Rose, and Ravaris Moore.

2016. “Does career and technical education strengthen the STEM pipeline? Comparing students with and without disabilities.” Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 26(4), pp.232-244.

Precision Gains from Publically Available School Proficiency Measures Compared to Study-Collected Test Scores in Education Cluster-Randomized Trials. NCEE 2010-4003

National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance

Deke, John, Lisa Dragoset, and Ravaris Moore

2010. “Precision Gains from Publically Available School Proficiency Measures Compared to Study-Collected Test Scores in Education Cluster-Randomized Trials. NCEE 2010-4003.” National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance.

Fall-related injuries in elderly cancer patients treated with neurotoxic chemotherapy: a retrospective cohort study

Journal of Geriatric Oncology

Ward, Peter R., Mitchell D. Wong, Ravaris Moore, and Arash Naeim

2014. “Fall-related injuries in elderly cancer patients treated with neurotoxic chemotherapy: a retrospective cohort study.” Journal of Geriatric Oncology 5(1): 57-64.

Implementation of the Building Strong Families Program

Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc, (M. Robin Dion, Alan Hershey, Heather Zaveri, Sarah Avellar, Debra Strong, Timothy Silman, and Ravaris Moore)

2008. Implementation of the Building Strong Families Program. Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Parental Divorce is Not Uniformly Disruptive to Children’s Educational Attainment

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116, no. 15 (2019): 7266-7271.

Brand, Jennie E., Ravaris Moore, Xi Song, and Yu Xie.

2020-01-01

Children whose parents divorce tend to have worse educational outcomes than children whose parents stay married. However, not all children respond identically to their parents divorcing. We focus on how the impact of parental divorce on children’s education varies by how likely or unlikely divorce was for those parents. We find a significant negative effect of parental divorce on educational attainment, particularly college attendance and completion, among children whose parents were unlikely to divorce. Families expecting marital stability, unprepared for disruption, may experience considerable adjustment difficulties when divorce occurs, leading to negative outcomes for children. By contrast, we find no effect of parental divorce among children whose parents were likely to divorce. Children of high-risk marriages, who face many social disadvantages over childhood irrespective of parental marital status, may anticipate or otherwise accommodate to the dissolution of their parents’ marriage. Our results suggest that family disruption does not uniformly disrupt children’s attainment.

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Why Does Parental Divorce Lower Children's Educational Attainment? A Causal Mediation Analysis

Sociological Science

Brand, Jennie E., Ravaris Moore, Xi Song, and Yu Xie

2019-11-01

Mechanisms explaining the negative effects of parental divorce on children’s attainment have long been conjectured and assessed. Yet few studies of parental divorce have carefully attended to the assumptions and methods necessary to estimate causal mediation effects. Applying a causal framework to linked U.S. panel data, we assess the degree to which parental divorce limits children’s education among whites and nonwhites and whether observed lower levels of educational attainment are explained by postdivorce family conditions and children’s skills. Our analyses yield three key findings. First, the negative effect of divorce on educational attainment, particularly college, is substantial for white children; by contrast, divorce does not lower the educational attainment of nonwhite children. Second, declines in family income explain as much as one- to two-thirds of the negative effect of parental divorce on white children’s education. Family instability also helps explain the effect, particularly when divorce occurs in early childhood. Children’s psychosocial skills explain about one-fifth of the effect, whereas children’s cognitive skills play a minimal role. Third, among nonwhites, the minimal total effect on education is explained by the offsetting influence of postdivorce declines in family income and stability alongside increases in children’s psychosocial and cognitive skills.

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